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Archive for November 1st, 2011

From IFI

Hartford Public High School is divided into multiple “academies,” two of which attended the first performance. When two teenage male characters kiss, a group of high school students attending the play audibly expressed their disgust and walked out of the performance. Subsequently the play, which was scheduled to be performed two more times for other groups of students, became a source of community and national outrage.

A local Connecticut news report stated that the principal of one of the school’s academies “noted the importance of accepting homosexual intimacy as society accepts heterosexual intimacy.” What right has a government employee acting in his official capacity as a school official to decide or state that students should accept the unproven, non-factual belief that homosexual intimacy is equivalent to heterosexual intimacy?

Read the whole thing.

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From Plains Daily – In a media advisory, the Fort Totten North Dakota Spirit Lake tribe, which has been supporting the “Fighting Sioux” name for the athletic teams of the University of North Dakota- will make what it termed as a “major announcement” this morning at 10:00 from its Fort Totten North Dakota headquarters.

Updates will be forthcoming.

The announcement is – The Spirit Lake Sioux are suing the NCAA!

Some of the allegations in the suit from the grandforksherald:

- The two tribes are “indispensable parties” who were left out of negotiations leading to a 2007 settlement agreement between the state of North Dakota and the NCAA, so the agreement is void.

- The NCAA has over-reached its jurisdiction and infringed on UND’s copyright on the “Fighting Sioux” logo.

- By failing to take into account “traditions, ceremonies and religious acts that are sacred to the Sioux Nations,” including a 1969 naming ceremony at UND, the NCAA has violated the federal Indian Religious Freedom Act.

- The NCAA’s application of its policy to UND violates plaintiffs’ freedom of speech and the federal Indian Civil Rights Act.

- The NCAA’s description of “Fighting Sioux” as a “hostile and abusive” term “soiled the name and reputation of the Sioux nation” and amount to defamation.

God bless the Standing Rock Sioux.

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